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Health and community professionals

Research shows people seeking help for gambling harm are often experiencing other problems, such as anxiety or substance use issues. A 2015 study found almost three in four people receiving help for gambling were experiencing co-occurring or ‘comorbid’ conditions. 

Conversely, clients of other services may be experiencing harm from gambling. A recent Foundation-funded study reported that six per cent of clients of Victorian mental health services experience severe gambling problems, a rate eight times higher than the general population.

Only 10 per cent of people with gambling problems seek formal help. When they do come into contact with services, it is often for other issues such as health, relationship breakdown or drug and alcohol issues which can result in problem gambling being unrecognised and untreated.

Supporting a client experiencing harm from gambling

Support for clients experiencing harm

There are several key considerations for health and welfare professionals when identifying and assessing clients who may be experiencing experiencing harm from their gambling. This section of the website provides guidance for identifying a gambling problem, counselling techniques and referring a client into Gambler's Help services.

Read more about supporting your client.

Learning and professional development

Professional Development Centre

Our learning and professional development program aims to strengthen the skills of Gambler’s Help professionals and others who work with people affected by gambling. It is informed by the needs and feedback of counsellors, community educators and venue support workers from our mainstream, In-language and Aboriginal Gambler’s Help services. We also collaborate with other sectors in providing and receiving training so we can deliver more holistic services.

Visit our Professional Development Centre.

Cross-sector collaboration

Cross-sector collaboration

We are working with partners across the health and human services sectors to continuously improve service integration and referral processes so we can provide Victorians seeking help with as seamless an experience as possible.

Read more about the benefits of cross-sector collaboration.

Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI)

Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI)

The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) is the standardised measure of at risk behaviour in problem gambling. Assessing where your client is now can help you make informed decisions on how to assist them.

View the PGSI quiz.

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